Category : Assembly Language Source Code
Archive   : DOCFILES.ZIP
Filename : POPCAL.DOC

 
Output of file : POPCAL.DOC contained in archive : DOCFILES.ZIP
POP-CAL Leo Forrest
Command 1986/No. 17

______________________________________________________

Purpose: Pops up a calendar window for any month from
January, 1583 to December, 9999.

Format: POP-CAL (loads command into memory)
Alt-C Toggles calendar on/off
Right-Arrow Advance one month
Left-Arrow Back one month
Up-Arrow Advance one year
Down-Arrow Back one year

Remarks: POP-CAL is a memory-resident utility and
should be loaded into memory before you call
up any applications programs. Normally, you
would simply enter POP-CAL as one line in
your AUTOEXEC.BAT file.

POP-CAL takes the current month and year as
its initial value. It subsequently remembers
your last-used calendar, facilitating
repeated references.

Notes:

1. You can use DEBUG to change the default
Alt-C toggle key by replacing the
Alt-key scan code value at offset :014B.
The default value is 2E, which will
appear, followed by a period, in
response to the E command shown below.
Enter only the new scan code, not the
2E. Thus, to change the program to use
Alt-Q (scan code 10) you would enter:
DEBUG POP-CAL.COM
E 14b 10
W
Q

The hex values for the various scan
codes are given in Appendix E of the IBM
BASIC manual (3.0) and also in the "Scan
Code Value Table" in connection with
SLASHBAR.COM.

2. While POP-CAL has been tested for
compatibility with a number of other
memory-resident programs, there is
always the possibility of a conflict
with other TSR (Terminate-Stay-Resident)
programs.



  3 Responses to “Category : Assembly Language Source Code
Archive   : DOCFILES.ZIP
Filename : POPCAL.DOC

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