Category : Assembly Language Source Code
Archive   : DOCFILES.ZIP
Filename : KEEPER.DOC

 
Output of file : KEEPER.DOC contained in archive : DOCFILES.ZIP

KEEPER Steven Holzner
Command PC Magazine Vol 4, No 15
Copyright 1985 Ziff-Davis Publishing Company
______________________________________________________

Purpose: Stores and displays the last ten commands
entered for immediate reexecution without
retyping.

Format: KEEPER (loads memory-resident program)
(toggles window display)

Remarks: KEEPER can store command lines of up to 50
characters each in length. After loading,
normally via your AUTOEXEC.BAT file, and
pressing Ctrl-N (the default trigger key; see
Option 1), the last 10 command lines are
shown in a window in the upper right-hand
corner of the display. If you wish to
execute one of the commands shown, move to
its line with the Up Arrow and Down Arrow
keys; the line currently selected blinks.
Pressing Ctrl-N again will reissue a blinking
command or, if no stored command line has
been selected, will return the display to
normal.

Notes:

1. KEEPER is not compatible with a number
of application programs (e.g., XyWrite)
that take over the keyboard interrupts.


Option 1: The default trigger key is Ctrl-N. Should
this be inconvenient, you can use the
KEEPER.BAS program to recreate KEEPER.COM
with a different trigger key. From the DOS
prompt simply enter

BASIC KEEPER

and the program will prompt you for your
choice of trigger key. After the KEEPER.COM
file is created in this way, it is a regular
DOS command and is not run under BASIC.






  3 Responses to “Category : Assembly Language Source Code
Archive   : DOCFILES.ZIP
Filename : KEEPER.DOC

  1. Very nice! Thank you for this wonderful archive. I wonder why I found it only now. Long live the BBS file archives!

  2. This is so awesome! 😀 I’d be cool if you could download an entire archive of this at once, though.

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